Tag Archives: Author Marketing Tip

Twitter Etiquette

by M.R. Goodhew

There are all kinds of rules to know about how to operate on twitter. Get some of these wrong and you’ll be unfollowed and even blocked by some users. The intensity of the set of standards that has developed on twitter is so ingrained into its users, that I choose to call this subject Twitter Etiquette.

The List

It’s best not tag a person in your post unless you know for sure it is okay with them. Using a followers handle in a tweet without permission will get you unfollowed and possibly even blocked.

You should steer-cleer of posting 1o or more tweets in a row, you’d be monopolizing the feed and this is considered spammy. You want to time your tweets at intervals so it’s not just your tweets that everyone is seeing.

You shouldn’t use characters in your tweets that look unfamiliar to a regular keyboard standard, people might think you are unprofessional and may fail to trust your brand. Plus, they may have a hard time interpreting your tweet.

Try not to abbreviate everything in your tweet, it could get irritating to try and read. A few abbreviations such as RT for retweet, TY for thank you, are simple abbreviations that nearly everyone understands. The more you abbreviate, the more you begin to appear less human, and you won’t gain popularity as quickly or have people wanting to engage with you.

tag your tweets copy

Use hashtags relevant to your brand with every post you make. Over three hashtags is too many. Keep it to a maximum of three hashtags and be sure you’re not spamming a hashtag. When your content doesn’t provide any valuable information to a person searching that hashtag, you know you are spamming.

Do share other peoples content. It is customary to share a followers content if they have retweeted you, followed you, or mentioned you. At the same time, be sure that the tweet of theirs that you’re sharing is their pinned tweet. If they don’t have a pinned tweet, a good place to check for their content is in their photos. Most tweeters will attach their brand marketing to alluring photos that end up in their photo feed. Do your best not to retweet a retweet, it’s just rude. The only time that this would be okay is if you just can’t locate something that they have shared that is their own.

Be sure to share your own content after sharing others so that when people come to your profile it’s your tweets they see and share. Pin your best and most important tweet to the top of your page.

Twitter Jail copy

Know that when you exceed your followers in follows by a certain percentage, twitter will not let you follow any more users until both sides balance out.

Thank people for following you with a tweet. It’s not just an opportunity to thank them, but your chance to get your brand out there in the feed. This is also a case where it is okay to use their twitter handle to mention them.  Include a quick call to action, and be sure to add a relevant photo that they will want to share. Most people retweet thank you’s anyway just as a common courtesy.

Automation copy

You can also automate a direct message (DM) to send out to your new followers that tells them little about you and invites them to your website to discover more. Inviting people to your platform is important for the marketing aspect of your brand. It brings them one step closer to becoming a loyal follower and purchasing your product or inquiring about your services. Be sure your automated DM doesn’t sound generic, people tend to skip over generic DM’s. They want to feel as if they are communicating with a real person and making a connection, not a bot.

Be a friendly connection and retweet your new followers pinned tweet, why not, you’re there anyway right? This will get their attention and more than likely bring them back to your profile where they will take a closer look at all you have to offer. Follow back and add them to a public or private list once you have scanned their feed and know what they’re all about. This will aid you in monitoring your network later.

Thank people for re-tweeting you with a tweet and use their handle to mention them, this shows other tweeters who is re-tweeting, and hence, who to follow. It is a nice gesture. You can again include a call to action that pitches your brand and takes them to a point of sale or to your website. Always include a relevant picture if you can because it calls attention to your tweet.

Be sure to also retweet your retweeters, it’s only fair and proper. And again, try your best not to tweet their retweets. It might be considered lazy and rude not to attempt to retweet their original content.

Twitter Handles copy

Do respond to your mentions by thanking your follower or fellow tweeter. It’s more than likely that the mention is not automated so they took some time and effort to connect with you. Communicate with people who mention you and then re-tweet or mention them when you share their content in return.

If you’re in business (which I assume you are if you’re reading this) then you want to maintain a certain air of professionalism which means that some subject matter is taboo. Gossip, political viewpoints, anything that might be considered sexist or racist, and religion are typical subjects to steer clear of if you don’t want to offend portions of your network.

Send out a Friday tweet to your favorite followers thanking them.  This is tagged #FF. Follow Friday is essentially a Twitter holiday with the aim of getting people to follow one another.

Don’t just pay attention to the people that are paying attention to you. Take the time to reach out to your network and make connections. This is a great opportunity to monitor your lists.

Do tweet random tweets, be a human, say real things. This will make your followers more inclined to connect with you and respond well to your brand. Twitter isn’t just about marketing and people want to know that you’re a living, breathing person.

I recommend that you do not validate your followers as it will drive them away, and respond to them personally for following you rather than having a service do it.

Try to sell your entire brand on twitter through your personality and your tweets.

This is one way to help you become a success in creating a network of targeted followers that interact with your content, rarely unfollow, purchase your product, and spread the word about your brand.

Do you have a general rule that I didn’t think of? What are your top twitter rules?


Available in June 2016

Book Cover 71

As an author you are in the business of selling books. If you’re not connected to twitter, you should be. Leveraging your network on twitter is essential to marketing your books. In this book you will discover:

  • the complete guide to the ins and outs of twitter
  • Who to follow and how to find them
  • Secrets to building influence on Twitter
  • the secrets to engaging your followers and making lasting connections
  • The formula behind successful marketing of your brand or author platform
  • Content strategies, time savers, and useful tips

Start your journey toward social media influence and business success!


 

The 7 Things Writers Need to Create Great Content

Love copy

This might seem squishy, but if you’re meant to be a writer, you know what I mean.

There is no substitute for the love of writing. For the passion of getting the words right, the head-scratching and the pacing around the house and the endless drafts that aren’t quite right yet.

If you don’t love language and your topic and the act of putting words together, none of the rest of this really means anything.

I could have just as easily used Compulsion, Obsession, or Bullheadedness for this section. Whichever word you choose, it’s about refusing to settle for weak writing, because the words matter.

AAOS copy

Writing for self-expression can be high art, pursued for the sake of your own experience of truth and beauty.

Professional writers work from an attitude of serving their audience. Serving them with truthful, beautiful words, yes. But also with language that meets their needs, language that clarifies rather than prettifies.

Novelists, copywriters, and content creators all live in service to our audiences. No matter how clever or perfectly poetic we may find a phrase, if it doesn’t serve the audience, it goes.

Confidence copy

It’s always struck me as odd that many of the most capable writers are also some of the most insecure.

But it doesn’t need to be that way. Confidence comes from putting the work in, to become a genuinely authoritative expert. It comes from research, craftsmanship, and seeing the difference you make to your audience.

Serious craftspeople are humble and proud at the same time.

The pride and confidence come from hours of deliberate practice – the kind of work that expands your abilities and challenges you to grow. The humility comes from the knowledge that a true pro is always improving, expanding, and refining.

Training copy

Many writers imagine that if you have a good writing voice and a strong opinion, you’re qualified to work as a professional copywriter.

Not so fast.

Great copywriters and content creators are fine wordsmiths, yes, but they’re also strategists. They understand what types of content work to attract attention, to stand out amid the sea of content clutter, to motivate buying behavior, and to help the audience make the journey from interested bystander to loyal customer.

Solid content and copywriting strategy come from training (and practice). You can get a lot of that training at Copyblogger.

Discipline copy

You may be a brilliant wordsmith and master strategist, but if you can’t get yourself the butt-in-chair time needed to produce a significant quantity of work, you won’t get where you want to go.

To a great degree, discipline is a set of habits that can be cultivated. As a writer, you can string together rituals, create the right work environment, and adopt the behaviors of productive writers.

As a working writer, you also need to throw in a set of habits that will ensure that you meet your deadlines, keep clients updated, and invoice your clients promptly.

If you care enough, you’ll do it. The habits can be difficult to put into place, but fortunately, once they’re in place, they tend to keep you on the right track. (That’s the difference between habits and will power.)

Marketer copy

Yes, there is some money in writing fiction. (For the lucky few, there’s a great deal of money. Emphasis on few.)

There’s also still a little bit of money in journalism and feature writing, especially if you have excellent contacts.

But for the most part, if you want to make a living as a writer, the fastest, most enjoyable way to do that is to write content to find more customers.

It’s interesting, it’s very much in demand, and it will get you researching and investigating as many different topics as you like.

You might think that this kind of writing is boring to do. Far from it. Creating really good content (as opposed to the mass of junk that makes up 95 percent of web copy) will call on your skills as a storyteller, investigator, wordsmith, travel writer, historian.

A well-qualified content marketer needs all the skills of a great feature or fiction writer — combined with solid marketing strategy.

You also, of course, need to get comfortable marketing yourself. This can be surprisingly tough even for writers who create superb marketing for their clients.

“Create a bunch of content and hope someone wants to do business with you” won’t work for your writing business any more than it will for your clients’. You need to apply the same strategies and frameworks to your own business that you do to theirs.

If this doesn’t come naturally to you, don’t let that worry you. It doesn’t come naturally to a lot of good writers. But it’s something that’s well within your ability to learn.

support copy

One of the tough things about living as a professional writer is that the path you walk is one you make yourself.

There’s no one to tell you which direction to go, no one to give you sign posts along the way, no one to outline your day for you and tell you where you need to be and when.

That’s also one of the fantastic things about living as a professional writer. But sometimes Fantastic is also Difficult.

Writing is a lonely business. And it can be just a little lonelier when you don’t have colleagues to bounce questions off of, or to share your gripes and triumphs with.

When you do find a community of writers, though, it’s a lovely thing. They’re some of the funniest, smartest, quirkiest people you’ll ever meet. And it just feels good to hang out with people who get you.


Source: http://www.copyblogger.com/writer-success-2014/

 

The Trouble With Author Spam

by M.R. Goodhew

Are You Unknowingly Spamming Your Social Networks?

Now days indie authors are feeling the pressure to make their social media networks work for them.

They have signed up on Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, Instagram, Facebook, and Pinterest or as many platforms as they can handle.

They have made tons of connections, traded page likes, and joined all the right groups.

They have studied up on marketing and created a great ad for their book with a catchy tagline and a great hook. Or, they are offering their book at a seriously discounted rate if not for free.

They have created their schedule for marketing and are sticking to it like clockwork. Posting their ad to their groups and feeds at at least three times a day at these particular times – 6 am, 9 am, 12 pm, 3 pm, 6 pm, and 9 pm.

The trouble is that they are now spamming these platforms with this ad. Their share shows up constantly along with thousands of others and has become irritating or is largely ignored. Who is this spammer, is it you?

All of these ads have begun to look the same and there is nothing that stops the public you are networked with, mostly authors, from scanning right past all of your hard work that went into that perfect ad. It’s SPAM.

And if that is not enough, you may be posting your ad for your book on the pages of your followers without their permission, spamming their timelines.

There has to be a better way.

And there is.

Build Your Network With Your Brand

Newsflash – becoming an author is not a get rich quick scheme. Your product is not in demand, there are thousands like it on the market. There are thousands of well written free books, discounted books, and unique books with catchy titles and good covers.

You need to stand out from the rest to generate the kind of sales you are looking for and to gain popularity.

Becoming an author is a business venture, not unlike launching a start-up. It takes years to see the profit and plenty of hours of overtime. Becoming an author is a commitment to your writing career and involves your effort and hard work just like anything else of value. My hat is off to those of you who have done it the right way, you’ve busted your butt creating your platform and poured your heart into your brand by doing what you do best, writing.

My advice for those of you who have not began with your brand is this…

The best way to launch your book is a year before you publish. You do this by creating your brand and building a website where you start a blog and you regularly post content related to your brand. You then share this content across your social media networks and begin to build your following the right way, by getting people interested in what you write.

You make connections with real people by talking to them. You read their articles and make comments. You share their content if it resonates with your brand or if you think your network might appreciate it. You guest post on other blogs. You share your content to your groups and you connect with the people in your group. Once you have drawn people to you with your content, it’s word of mouth more than ads that will skyrocket your sales.

There is a time and place for your ad. Once or twice a week in your groups, three times a day on Twitter, once every other day on Google+ and Facebook. You can also append your ad to the bottom of each blog post, this is a great way to market your book.

Find out how to build your author brand in this article. Discovering your Brand

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Become Part of the Conversation through Blogging

If you are passionate about your subject and are willing to write about it regularly (no less than three times per week), a blog can be a fantastic—and free way of building an audience for both you and your work. You can start your blog with WordPress. It’s free, and sign-up is very simple. Below are the steps to help you get started:

  • Set Up an Account: Visit the WordPress.com and set up a free account to create your blog. Or build your own WordPress website by following these simple steps at How to Set Up Your Author Website
  • Give It a Name: I suggest that you use your name so that the blog can expand to include future books you may publish.
  • Write a Post: Once this is done, click “create post.” Type your entry just like you would an email. You can choose different fonts and sizes of text, or add pictures, lists, and links to websites.
  • Preview and Publish: Click on the preview button to see if you like the way your entry looks. If not, you can edit it until you are satisfied. Once you are happy with the results, click “publish.”

Write in Blogging Style and Observe Blogging Etiquette

  • Regularly Update: Update your blog frequently, three times a week is a minimum but set yourself a realistic schedule and stick to it.
  • Keep It Short and Concise: Keep in mind that in the blogosphere, people have shorter attention spans than they do offline so you need to make your posts easily digestible and informative – 250 words can be enough.
  • Make It Compelling: Strive to create blog copy that is compelling, interesting, and will invite further conversations. Remain true to your brand. Stay on topic so that you don’t lose your audience.
  • Engage: This is an opportunity to tell your readers what you are writing about. Ask them what they would like to hear more about. This kind of involvement will make them feel attached to you and your work, building an audience that will stay with you from book to book.
  • Involve: Pose questions and comment on people’s comments. A blog is meant to be a community. Respond directly to people’s comments, either in the comments or in a new blog post. This will engage readers so they will come back more often.
  • Give It Personality: Above all else, remember that your blog should be an extension of you, let people know who you are and your opinions should be reflected in your writing style

Target Your Audience and Build Upon It

  • Spread the Word: Once you have been posting regularly for a couple of weeks, tell your friends, colleagues, and contacts about your blog and ask them to tell their friends, colleagues, and contacts. Send an email or newsletter to your email address book or database introducing the blog and linking to it.
  • Utilize Your Sphere of Influence: Look around the Internet for related blogs, and read and post to them. Commenting and becoming part of the blog community will cause others visit your blog and do the same.
  • Use Your Amazon Author Page: Once you begin blogging, be sure to sign up for Amazon’s Author Central. This is a program that will allow you to feed your blog directly onto your author page on Amazon.com, a very powerful way to share compelling content with possible customers.

Optimize Your Blog and Link Like Crazy!

  • Submit Sitemap to Google Webmaster Tools: The first place you should take your sitemap for a new website is Google Webmaster Tools. If you don’t already have one, simply create a free Google Account, then sign up for Webmaster Tools. Add your new site to Webmaster Tools, then go to Optimization > Sitemaps and add the link to your website’s sitemap to Webmaster Tools to notify Google about it and the pages you have already published. For extra credit, create an account with Bing and submit your sitemap to them via their Webmaster Tools. Submit url’s to Bing, Google, etc.
  • Identify Clear Keywords: Create a good, concise description for your blog, as well as relevant keywords. Make your headlines snappy.
  • Tag: This is easy to do on the “create post” page. Just enter the relevant keywords in the box separated by commas, this will make your blog easier to search.
  • Link to Retailers: Use your custom “Buy the Book” landing page. The page should be live six months in advance of your book’s publication date (You can list pre-order books with Kindle Direct Publishing for eBooks, and Amazon Advantage for paperback publications).
  • Social Networking: Use Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, etc., to let others know what you’re blogging about and provide links back to your blog.
  • RSS: Put a subscription icon on every page.
  • Pictures: Use images whenever possible.
  • Learn from Others: Take a look at your favorite writers’ blogs and emulate some of the techniques that make their postings great.

Participate On Other Blogs

This can be a very powerful tool for promotion and raising your profile. Here are some tips for getting started:

  • Find Your Community: Use a blog search engine to find blogs in your subject/area of expertise.
  • Make Your Mark: Once you have identified those that feel relevant and compelling, become part of the conversation by commenting on a post that interests you and add something that readers of the blog might be interested to know.
  • Let People Know Where You Are: Link to your blog or website if you’ve written something relevant to the conversation. If you are bringing something valuable to the debate, people will begin to follow you and will be more interested in what you publish.

For Your Cover Design, Illustration, & Author Graphics See Michelle Rene

Book Cover Designer and Marketing Design

 

Author Tip: Is Short Story Writing Something You Should Do?

images (4)Why Short Stories

By Michelle Rene Goodhew

You may not have considered short story writing before, but here are some reasons why you should. This article will also tell you how to go about crafting a short story.

Short stories are for everyone. They are fun and easy to read as well as easy to write. Short stories can be read in one or two sittings, they grip the reader’s attention and don’t let go until the end. They are popular. Remember all of those story ideas that just weren’t developed enough for that novel? These are perfect little critter’s to get you started writing short stories.

Maybe you are a new author just starting out trying to finish up that first great book. Or maybe you’re an experienced author working on a sequel or at best trying to dream one up. As a writer you need to keep busy and stay focused. Writing is a business, unless you truly believe you’ve only have just that one great one in you, you should be working on ways to expand your business of writing. Here are some reasons you should consider short story writing.

  • You will add more books to your brand.
  • You will improve your exposure.
  • You can write them fast.
  • You will improve your skills as a writer.
  • You will publish more often and have more books out there for consumers.
  • You have the potential to reach more people and make more money.
  • You will experience satisfaction from completing new works.

What Is Short Story Writing All About

What is a Short Story

A short story can be from 1500 words to 30,000.

JK-Rowlings-Phoenix-Plot-Outline

JK Rowling’s Phoenix Plot Outline

How to Develop a Short Story

First, you start with your idea. Now you take the idea and map it out with an outline. Don’t be too serious at first, let the idea guide you.

You develop your short story the same way you do a traditional manuscript. Flesh out your idea with an outline. Start by separating your idea into three acts, the beginning, middle, and end. Each act has a beginning, middle and end as well. These can be chapters. And each chapter has a beginning and middle and end. These can be scenes. By writing each chapter as it unfolds like the flow of a book, you have the power to keep your story strong and your readers engaged.

Story Outline

If you have trouble setting up your outline, the steps below are ones that I refer to and find helpful.

The First Act:

  1. The hook: the first page in the first chapter catches your reader’s attention and convinces them to read on.
  2. The inciting event: the first event that befalls in your story. This is what kicks everything off. What event starts the ball rolling in your stories plot?
  3. The key event: this is what drags your protagonist into the plot. Your character has to be pulled into the mess. This is where your character becomes officially engaged in your story.
  4. The first plot point: marks the end of the first act and the beginning of the second. This is where everything changes for your character. The first act sets up your characters ‘normal’ world and introduces the important characters, the settings, and describes the stakes. The first plot point should rock that normal world. Everything changes and your protagonist will be forced to start reaching to the new status quo.

The Second Act:

  1. The first half of the second act: Your character is going to spend the first half of the second half of the book in reaction mode. For the next quarter of the book your protagonist will be fighting to keep their head above the water.
  2. The midpoint: Your stories second major plot point. This is where everything changes again. But now your protagonist is prepared due to the last shake-up and is ready to start taking action rather than just reacting. This belongs smack in the middle of your story.
  3. The second half of the second act: After the midpoint your character is going to start going on the offensive. They are no longer willing to let the antagonist simply bring the fight to them. They will start implementing their own plans and throwing off their insecurities. This continues to three-quarters of the way through the book and the beginning of the third act.

The Third Act:

  1. The third plot point: this is your final major plot point that changes everything. Whatever happens here is going to force your character to a low place. They will have to analyze their actions and motivations and get down to the core of their own personal character arch. This is where they will start to identify their own destructive or ineffective mindsets and start rejecting the personal traits that have held them back up until now. Begins at the 75% mark.
  2. The climax: this is what it’s all about. Your climax is where your story finally gets down to business. This is the point of the whole story. This is where the conflict must finally be resolved. Although events will be heating up all the way through the third act, the Climax Proper won’t begin until around the 90% mark. The climactic moment itself won’t hit until the very end, perhaps a scene or two from the end of the book.
  3. The resolution: caps your story with finality. This important scene is the exhale to your climax’s inhale. Here you give readers the opportunity to see how your character will react to the events of the climax. How are they a different person than they were in the beginning? How has the world changed around them? How does their future look from here?

 

How Short Stories Can Boost Your Writing Career from the Creative Penn

Get into bookstores

Write short stories and publish them with companies who are already producing titles that you can find in bookstores. There are plenty of short story markets that are available at Barnes and Noble. To find them, simply go down to your local shop and ask about them. The assistant will happily direct you toward their magazine rack or anthologies.

Expand your presence on retail sites

Now that bookstores are digital, retail space is infinite. So how do you stand out in an infinite bookstore? By taking up the largest percentage of that bookstore as possible. The more room you take up, the more likely someone is to stumble onto your work.

Short stories can help fill out your presence on retailer websites. While a novel can take upwards of a year to publish from start to finish, short stories can be written, edited, and finished in a much shorter time frame; and with a smaller budget.

By publishing short stories alongside your longer work, you expand your presence on a retailer website, and thus come up more often in searches and on featured pages. This extra traffic will increase sales of your other titles

Fill in the gaps between novel releases

Novels are hard work. It can take months or sometimes years to get them right. The publishing process might have been majorly simplified by modern tools, but the writing process is still just as arduous as ever.

Short stories, by comparison, are simpler. Not easier, because writing a great short story is still a major challenge. But the process is much simpler. Writing short stories is similar to writing a single scene (or a few scenes) for a novel. Except, you don’t have to pay attention to an over-arching storyline.

Publishing short fiction while working on a novel is a great method to keep your audience reading your stuff and gives you something to promote while you work on your big project.

Experiment with new genres.

Short stories are a smaller commitment than a novel. You can write a short story in a new genre in a weekend and file it away if it doesn’t work. If you put the time in required to write a novel in a new genre, you might feel obligated to then publish it and put your full power behind it. That is a huge risk and most authors simply avoid it.

The risk involved with writing and publishing shorts is much lower. It is a medium that is open to experimentation. I find that a lot of writers are pigeon-holed into the genre they write and feel that if they wrote in other genres, they won’t find success. That is simply not true.

If you’ve never explored other genres and other mediums, you don’t know what will work for you. Especially if you haven’t found the success you’ve been looking for, experimentation with short stories is a great way to figure out what your readers want and to then follow it up with a novel.

Expand your universe.

In addition to all of the previously mentioned benefits to writing and publishing short fiction, the most interesting to me is to use short fiction to expand a fictional universe that you’ve already created.

I’m sure there have been tons of scenes that you’ve had to cut because they just didn’t work in your novel. Why not flesh those scenes out as short stories and put them up as companion pieces? Your readers want to know more about your characters. They already love them (or they should, right?). You can skip a lot of the backstory and reward your true fans with extra scenes that they otherwise wouldn’t be able to get.

An astonishingly small number of writers actually do this, less than 1%. You’re working hard to write your stories. Don’t just trash every scene that doesn’t fit. Re-purpose it as a supplemental short. Or write that scene that you’ve always wanted to write as a short and give your readers an extra taste of something different. Who knows, it might catch on and be the influence for you to write a new novel with a market-proven hook.

Short stories are a struggling form of writing when compared to novels. But they don’t have to be. Writers who approach writing short stories from a smarter perspective, one that uses insights from marketing and experience in the industry, can revive the short story. It happens one short at a time.


Source: http://www.thecreativepenn.com/2013/05/12/short-stories/

 Source: “Outlining Your Novel” http://www.amazon.com/Outlining-Your-Novel-Map-Success/dp/0978924622


 Contact Michelle Rene, the One-Stop-Shop for Your Indie Author Needs

covers

Author Marketing – How to Create Posts for Twitter That Sell Your Book

twitter-wallpapers (1)Tweets are made up of different parts. Every tweet should have a hook – the tweet body, but you can also add other things to them to make them more effective. Things like hashtags, pictures, links, handles, etc. Not every tweet has to have each of them, in fact, it’s best to mix them up, but they all help your tweet become more effective.

Let’s look at some of them a little bit closer.

Here is a site that offers a free twitter ecourse: http://twittertoolsbook.com/about-us/

The Hook

The most important part of your tweet is your hook. This is the main text of your tweet that catches the reader’s attention. It might be a call to action, a review snippet, a question, etc.

The best tweets are ones that people can respond to in some way – physically or emotionally.

An effective book tweet, should have a link that they can physically click. You can write other Tweets that don’t, but if you are promoting your book, you should have a link to it in some way (e.g. sales page, website, a review, etc.) Even if your tweet is a quote, it should be followed by a link.

Links do take 22 characters (regardless of their original length), so you’ll need to shorten the rest of your hook accordingly.

Here are a few examples of hook phrases:

  • Discover #epicfantasy adventure on the book page for my #fantasy trilogy the Rise of the Fifth Order! http://ow.ly/Mcth3

Hashtags and Twitter Handles

Hashtags are like keywords or phrases on Twitter. They can help your tweet gain more exposure. Here are several lists of hashtags that you can use.

  1. One for your niche

#EpicFantasy

  1. One for authors

#ASMSG #IARTG #IAN1 #Bookboost

  1. One for the customer

#whattoread #bookworm #RRBC #FridayReads #amreading

The general rule is that you don’t want to add more than 3 hashtags to a tweet and you always want to make sure they are relevant.

If we took the same 5 tweets from above and added hashtags, they might look like this:

  • One epic fantasy adventure that will leave you wanting more. http://goo.gl/3lIIcX #RRBC #Bookboost #IARTG
  • Coffee & an epicfantasy series; what more could you want? http://t.co/kb6FpEXIb3 #Fantasy #ASMSG #FridayReads
  • Would you protect a girl whose forbidden abilities condemn her to death? #epicfantasy Rule of Fire! http://myBook.to/RuleofFire #fantasy
  • Discover #epicfantasy adventure on the book page for my #fantasy trilogy the Rise of the Fifth Order! http://ow.ly/Mcth3 #amreading

As you can see, hashtags can be used within your hook or added at the end.

Twitter Handles are sometimes used like hashtags, but they really shouldn’t be. Hashtags are keywords where Twitter handles are people. They are two different things.

When mentioning other Twitter users in your tweets, you have to make sure you’re not being spammy. I generally only tag someone who is directly related to the tweet – e.g. they wrote the review, blog post, or book I’m linking to.

Twitter Pics

Twitter pictures are a great way to get more visibility for your tweet. When you’re scrolling down your feed, they just jump out at you. Instead of seeing a small tweet, you get a picture:

Michelle Rene on Twitter   Is Elizabet strong enough to do what has to be done  US http   t.co 6pfrhMPLVA  IARTG  scifi  amreading http   t.co MX05cSNM3C

Michelle Rene on Twitter   Elizabet is in for the fight of her life in this surprising  scifi  thriller http   t.co PjH6gpQbDG  bookworm  IARTG http   t.co 0jYUpypANd

They are also displayed on your profile on the left hand side for even more exposure:

Michelle Rene   MichelleRene00    Twitter

The photos above are from my reader account, @MichelleRene00

  •  To add a picture, simply click the camera button underneath the tweet box:

The only warning I have when it comes to adding pictures, is simply to note that in the main Twitter stream, the photos are rectangular, while on your profile they are square. So you can see how some of ours are cut off.

To prevent that, it’s recommended that all of your pictures are sized at 375 x 375 pixels. The Twitter feed will display up to 435 x 375 pixels, cropping anything larger to fit that size – viewers can see the whole thing when they click on it or visit your gallery. The 375 x 375 will be automatically reduced to the 90 x 90 displayed on your profile, anything else will be reduced and cropped. So, just something to consider.

Still not sure what to tweet? Outsource it!

Want to learn more about outsourcing your social media? This presentation will take you through how to do that while maintaining ownership over the pieces that you need to in order to maintain an authentic expression of self.

http://www.slideshare.net/erinblaskie/how-to-outsource-social-media

Best Twitter Directories to Submit your Twitter Profile

http://www.shoutmeloud.com/best-twitter-directories.html

http://twittertoolsbook.com/twitter-directories/

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Source: http://www.trainingauthors.com/how-to-write-an-effective-book-tweet/#ixzz3ZMAjVkh6