Tag Archives: Creative Writing

Wednesdays Visual Writing Prompt

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found on flicker’s  Psychedelic Maniac


Wednesdays Visual Writing Prompt

I am starting to find some really amazing pictures. I love this one, I hope it inspires you. With the illusion of movement, I couldn’t resist it 🙂

Challenge

Use this prompt to think outside the box, to go somewhere with your writing that you had never dared go before. See what kind of magic you can work with that brilliant mind of yours. You are a storyteller so this will be a breeze.

Maybe you could use this prompt to add a scene to the current book you are writing. Maybe you could start a short story that you can give away for free to subscribers of your blog. A picture like this can spark ideas you may never have considered.

The Rules

There aren’t really many rules, just enough to get your blog some attention and get new people interested in your writing or the current book you have to offer.

  • Write in any genre you like – poetry too
  • Tag this post in your post (share this post to your WordPress blog as a new post) so I can find you (it will ping back to this post), then I can check out your work, and promote you on my social sites. Or share your response to the writing challenge in the comments section below.
  • You have until the following Tuesday to complete this writer’s prompt, then I will be posting a new one on the following day, next Wednesday.

If you have any suggestions for future Wednesday Visual Writing Prompts, please let me know in the comments:-)

I look forward to reading your writing.

(if you post past the deadline I will do my best to read your work and share it on my social networks as time permits).

Have Fun!

Is Your Writing Fueled by Passion?

iyw copy

If you are a writer you know the difference between creating content and inspired writing. Creating content is a process while inspiration is an explosion of passion. You can feel it when the words you write spill onto the page as if on fire.

Why You Should Write Inspired

Writing that’s inspired gets us hooked. It sells us things we wouldn’t otherwise buy. Inspired writing motivates us to take action because it ignites our own passion. It can create burning desire, need and want. It pulls us in and feeds us something we’ve been craving.

Content can be methodical, sometimes appearing as reworked copy that’s been sold to us from many other sources. Writing that’s inspired packs a certain punch that ordinary content just doesn’t provide.

As writers, we are faced with the challenge of creating content that grabs the reader’s attention, selling them whatever brand, book, or service that we promote. From our bios to our sales copy we are put in the position where we must entice, enchant, inform, and sell.

Writing inspired is fueled by our true voice, it has a magical element within it that readers devour. The simple truth all writers face is that they need great copy, and inspired writing creates exactly that.

Where to Find Inspiration

Read copy that inspires you. But where do we look for inspiration… if you are a writer of any kind, the best place to be inspired by copywriting is at Crayon.co. You’ll find thousands of useful examples of inspired writing and you can use them to fuel your own writing.

You can also try new things as often as possible which often gives rise to inspiration. Learn new things every day. Recall an event or a moment that fueled your passion for writing and practice capturing that moment.

These are all great ways to become inspired to write from the passionate place within.

How to Write Inspired

When you have an inspiring idea, give yourself a moment to soak it in, allow it wash through your mind and your senses and begin to unfold to you. Take what’s unfolding and write with purpose, just to get the passion down on paper. You can organize and edit later so don’t let trivialities get in the way of the moment.

Just let yourself write. Pay attention to the small details that are developing from your initial inspiration. Use them to continue writing or to make a list of bullet points you’d like to cover. These details will expand upon the inspiration that got you started and deepen its meaning.

All the time, remain aware of the inspiration you were hoping to capture, that one idea, the thing that sparked you and got the writing rolling. You want to capture the main essence of what your writing, the big picture. You can do this by being descriptive and including examples that the reader can relate to.

The Payoffs

The payoff for practicing inspired writing is content that is better appreciated and additionally shared more often by readers. This is a good practice to help acquire your voice in writing as well, because it’s content that comes from deep within you and has a different feel, often expressing your voice more freely. Inspired writing may also come across as more personal to your reader as if they’re getting to know you through your writing style because you express yourself freely through this writing process.

You will improve your writing and content creation abilities and therefore stand to gain a greater following. The benefits of writing inspired are substantial with regular practice and will help you grow as a writer.

mrg copy

Dance of Life – In Response to Wednesdays Visual Writing Prompt

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He looked deep into her eyes, and she responded by pressing her thigh into him. This was the tango, one of the most sensual dances ever envisioned.  It requires close body contact with your partner, especially the midriff.  Your arms are not as entwined as your legs.  Often described as the most romantic, yet erotic, partner dance.

She lingered with her thigh for a moment longer than the music required, sending a not so secret message to her partner. Their relationship was more than a dancing pair for exhibition.  Dance was a long lasting conduit of intimacy.  He responded to her by squeezing her hand and she smiled that knowing smile he was always expecting. Silky, confident movements with the thought of more private moments, was a physical metaphor for their enduring connection. The tango represented to them their amorous partnership, their never ending love of each other in the dance of life.

Check out the author’s beautiful blog: Dance of Life

Writing Chapter One – Tips from D. Wallace Peach

by D. Wallace Peach

I’ve wanted to write about first chapters for a while, primarily because they’re so important. After all, they’re the gateway to Chapter 2 and getting a reader to Chapter 2 is a fantastic idea.

I did some research and almost instantly the rule-resistant rebel in me kicked in. She’s the writer who scowls at formulas, who insists that form has to fit the story, not the other way around. She’s the reader who doesn’t want to read the same story over and over with different titles.

Well, I suppressed the first-born smarty-pants part of my personality and learned a few things.

First, I learned that there are actually a number of perfectly legitimate types of first chapters. Writer’s Digest has a great article by Jeff Gerke that describes 4 approaches with examples (summarized here):

  • The Prolog – A prolog is an episode that pertains to your story but does not include the hero (or includes the hero at a time well before the story proper begins, when he’s a child). It might not be “Chapter 1” per se, but it can serve as a legitimate opening—if it works.
  • The Hero Action Beginning – In a hero action beginning, the hero is onstage, doing something active and interesting related to the launching of the core story (it need not involve explosions and car chases, but it certainly can).
  • The In Medias Res Beginning (in the middle of things ) – With in medias res, you start at a point deep in the story, show a bit of activity to intrigue the reader, and then you hit the rewind button and spend some or all of the rest of the book catching up to that moment.
  • The Frame Device – The final major way of beginning your first chapter is to use a frame device. In this, your story is bookended on the front and back (and usually a few instances in the middle) by a story that is outside the main story. The primary tale is framed by this other story.

With that out of the way, I went in search of tips that apply to Chapter 1’s regardless of the book, tips that I could apply as I conceive of, write, and edit my stories. As usual, there are exceptions to these tips, and the list is not exhaustive.

Context: Backstory, Setting, and Detail

  • Avoid backstory. Include the bare minimum necessary and trickle the rest in as needed.
  • Don’t overdo setting. Give a smattering of strong, vibrant details to establish a sense of place and time. Then fill in the rest later as the story unfolds.
  • Connect the character to the setting so it isn’t just a backdrop. You might show how the character interacts with the setting.
  • There’s no need to skimp on details that serve the story. If your story is about snipers, give sniper details. Make sure they’re sharp and interesting. Avoid being vague. Write tight!

Structure: Theme, Mood, and Plot

  • Start the book as late in the story as you can. Does your story still work if you start with Chapter 2? If so, Cut chapter 1.
  • Write a great first line. A great first line grabs the reader’s interest.
  • The theme is the argument that the story is making. The first chapter should hint at theme.
  • Establish your mood. Ask yourself how you want the reader to feel while reading the book.
  • Think of every chapter as a short story with a mini-plot and conflict, especially Chapter 1.
  • Avoid telegraphing. Let the immediacy of the action carry the chapter to the end. Keep your pov tight.

 Character

  • Most writing experts will recommend introducing your protagonist in the first chapter. Some recommend introducing your antagonist as well. Avoid opening with other characters talking about the main character.
  • Make your reader care about your character. How is the character at risk?
  • Have your character engaged – active versus passive.
  • Not absolutely necessary, but dialog is a great way to reveal character, and conflict and manage pace.

Conflict

  • Have some sort of conflict – physical, emotional, or mental. Conflict disrupts the status quo. Conflict is drama and it’s interesting.
  • You don’t need to spell out the stakes for the entire book in chapter one, but hint at why the conflict matters.
  • A note on action: Rip-roaring action might be fun, but it’s best if the reader cares about the character. Without an investment in character and context, an action scene can feel shallow.

Hooks

  • End your first chapter and each chapter with a moment of mystery, an introduction of conflict, or a twist of the tale. It doesn’t have to be a huge one; it just needs to be intriguing enough to propel the reader forward.
  • Mystery. While action needs context, one of mystery’s strengths is that it makes the reader wait for context. It’s okay not to explain everything. At the same time, mystery does not equal confusion – find the balance.

Happy Writing!

Thanks for the Tips D  🙂     Source: Writing Chapter One – Tips

Wednesdays Visual Writing Prompt

wvwp-022-copyWednesdays Visual Writing Prompt

Challenge

Use this prompt to think outside the box, to go somewhere with your writing that you had never dared go before. See what kind of magic you can work with that brilliant mind of yours. You are a storyteller so this will be a breeze.

Maybe you could use this prompt to add a scene to the current book you are writing. Maybe you could start a short story that you can give away for free to subscribers of your blog. A picture like this can spark ideas you may never have considered.

The Rules

There aren’t really many rules, just enough to get your blog some attention and get new people interested in your writing or the current book you have to offer.

  • Write in any genre you like – poetry too
  • Tag this post in your post (share this post to your WordPress blog as a new post) so I can find you (it will ping back to this post), then I can check out your work, and promote you on my social sites. Or share your response to the writing challenge in the comments section below.
  • You have until the following Tuesday to complete this writer’s prompt, then I will be posting a new one on the following day, next Wednesday.

If you have any suggestions for future Wednesday Visual Writing Prompts, please let me know in the comments:-)

I look forward to reading your writing.

(if you post past the deadline I will do my best to read your work and share it on my social networks as time permits).

Have Fun!