Tag Archives: For Writer’s

Tools to Get You Started with NaNoWriMo

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Today is the official start of NaNoWriMo! Are you ready? Well not to worry, I have a few extras to help get you off to a great start!

See Below…


What is NaNoWriMo?

NaNoWriMo is a worldwide event and contest that takes place every year in the month of November. The organization sponsors a website where you can join the event, commit to writing at least a 50,000 word novel over the 30 days of November, track your progress, get access to pep talks and support, and meet fellow writers. You earn badges as you progress and can even start a sponsor page where your friends and family can sponsor your writing.

You write your novel using your own materials: on your preferred word-processing program, by hand, by typewriter, etc. All writers at any stage are welcome. Outlines, character sketches, and other planning steps are encouraged. Just be sure to only count words written during the month. Your novel is fully protected!

See below for links to sign up!


What Do You Win if You Win?

You win NaNoWriMo by writing 50,000 words of your novel between November 1 and November 30. There’s no limit on how many people can win! Just be sure that you’ve validated your 50,000-word novel by turning it in anytime between November 20th and November 30th at 11:59 pm.

You will still win if you reach your goal but have not yet “completed” your novel. Keep writing! What you win is the satisfaction that you’ve completed a novel in thirty days and a collection of Wrimo-only offers from righteous companies who donated to NaNoWriMo in 2016.

Over 250 NaNoWriMo novels have been traditionally published.


Some Tips

  • Take risks with your writing.
  • Drink coffee. A lot of coffee.
  • Make a playlist to be your novel-writing soundtrack.
  • The first week is easier than the second week
  • Lower your standards for household cleanliness. You can clean in December.
  • If you are stuck for finding a quiet place in your house to write, try the bathroom. People rarely interrupt when you’re in the bathroom.
  • Back up your work; emailing pages to yourself is a good option.
  • Don’t edit what you’ve already written – keep moving forward.
  • Take occasional breaks while writing to step outside.
  • Reward yourself for work completed
  • Don’t give up.

Some Great Advice


Some Downloadable PDF’s


Some Awesome Resources


NaNoWriMo Link

NaNoWriMo Sign-Up

National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) believes stories matter. The event began in 1999, and in 2005, National Novel Writing Month became a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. NaNoWriMo’s programs now include National Novel Writing Month in November, Camp NaNoWriMo, the Young Writers Program, Come Write In, and the “Now What?” Months.


Wednesdays Visual Writing Prompt

The video and gif below show a quintessential gray alien supposedly captured by the Russian KGB; the video gives more detail about the alleged relationship between Russia and the aliens, and an agreement that prohibited the Russians from recording their communications with the aliens…it’s got me convinced!

What do you think?

I’m really excited at the prospect of reading all of the shorts created from this awesome footage prompt!

Gray aliens crash landing on this planet is a long-documented phenomenon that has been investigated by UFO researchers as well as other more mainstream journalists. Though the theories vary about what exactly they are and what they are here for –

Though the theories vary about what exactly they are and what they are here for, there isn’t much debate in the community anymore about whether or not they exist!

So, one must then wonder…

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Wednesdays Visual Writing Prompt

Use this prompt to think outside the box, to go somewhere with your writing that you had never dared go before. See what kind of magic you can work with that brilliant mind of yours. You are a storyteller so this will be a breeze.

Maybe you could use this prompt to add a scene to the current book you are writing. Maybe you could start a short story that you can give away for free to subscribers of your blog. A picture like this can spark ideas you may never have considered.

The Rules

There aren’t really many rules, just enough to get your blog some attention and get new people interested in your writing or the current book you have to offer.

  • Write in any genre you like – poetry too
  • Tag this post in your post (share this post to your WordPress blog as a new post) so I can find you (it will ping back to this post), then I can check out your work, and promote you on my social sites. Or share your response to the writing challenge in the comments section below.
  • You have until the following Tuesday to complete this writer’s prompt, then I will be posting a new one on the following day, next Wednesday.

If you have any suggestions for future Wednesday Visual Writing Prompts, please let me know in the comments:-)

I look forward to reading your writing.

Do you believe?

Writing Chapter One – Tips from D. Wallace Peach

by D. Wallace Peach

I’ve wanted to write about first chapters for a while, primarily because they’re so important. After all, they’re the gateway to Chapter 2 and getting a reader to Chapter 2 is a fantastic idea.

I did some research and almost instantly the rule-resistant rebel in me kicked in. She’s the writer who scowls at formulas, who insists that form has to fit the story, not the other way around. She’s the reader who doesn’t want to read the same story over and over with different titles.

Well, I suppressed the first-born smarty-pants part of my personality and learned a few things.

First, I learned that there are actually a number of perfectly legitimate types of first chapters. Writer’s Digest has a great article by Jeff Gerke that describes 4 approaches with examples (summarized here):

  • The Prolog – A prolog is an episode that pertains to your story but does not include the hero (or includes the hero at a time well before the story proper begins, when he’s a child). It might not be “Chapter 1” per se, but it can serve as a legitimate opening—if it works.
  • The Hero Action Beginning – In a hero action beginning, the hero is onstage, doing something active and interesting related to the launching of the core story (it need not involve explosions and car chases, but it certainly can).
  • The In Medias Res Beginning (in the middle of things ) – With in medias res, you start at a point deep in the story, show a bit of activity to intrigue the reader, and then you hit the rewind button and spend some or all of the rest of the book catching up to that moment.
  • The Frame Device – The final major way of beginning your first chapter is to use a frame device. In this, your story is bookended on the front and back (and usually a few instances in the middle) by a story that is outside the main story. The primary tale is framed by this other story.

With that out of the way, I went in search of tips that apply to Chapter 1’s regardless of the book, tips that I could apply as I conceive of, write, and edit my stories. As usual, there are exceptions to these tips, and the list is not exhaustive.

Context: Backstory, Setting, and Detail

  • Avoid backstory. Include the bare minimum necessary and trickle the rest in as needed.
  • Don’t overdo setting. Give a smattering of strong, vibrant details to establish a sense of place and time. Then fill in the rest later as the story unfolds.
  • Connect the character to the setting so it isn’t just a backdrop. You might show how the character interacts with the setting.
  • There’s no need to skimp on details that serve the story. If your story is about snipers, give sniper details. Make sure they’re sharp and interesting. Avoid being vague. Write tight!

Structure: Theme, Mood, and Plot

  • Start the book as late in the story as you can. Does your story still work if you start with Chapter 2? If so, Cut chapter 1.
  • Write a great first line. A great first line grabs the reader’s interest.
  • The theme is the argument that the story is making. The first chapter should hint at theme.
  • Establish your mood. Ask yourself how you want the reader to feel while reading the book.
  • Think of every chapter as a short story with a mini-plot and conflict, especially Chapter 1.
  • Avoid telegraphing. Let the immediacy of the action carry the chapter to the end. Keep your pov tight.

 Character

  • Most writing experts will recommend introducing your protagonist in the first chapter. Some recommend introducing your antagonist as well. Avoid opening with other characters talking about the main character.
  • Make your reader care about your character. How is the character at risk?
  • Have your character engaged – active versus passive.
  • Not absolutely necessary, but dialog is a great way to reveal character, and conflict and manage pace.

Conflict

  • Have some sort of conflict – physical, emotional, or mental. Conflict disrupts the status quo. Conflict is drama and it’s interesting.
  • You don’t need to spell out the stakes for the entire book in chapter one, but hint at why the conflict matters.
  • A note on action: Rip-roaring action might be fun, but it’s best if the reader cares about the character. Without an investment in character and context, an action scene can feel shallow.

Hooks

  • End your first chapter and each chapter with a moment of mystery, an introduction of conflict, or a twist of the tale. It doesn’t have to be a huge one; it just needs to be intriguing enough to propel the reader forward.
  • Mystery. While action needs context, one of mystery’s strengths is that it makes the reader wait for context. It’s okay not to explain everything. At the same time, mystery does not equal confusion – find the balance.

Happy Writing!

Thanks for the Tips D  🙂     Source: Writing Chapter One – Tips

Networking – Are You a Writer?

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Hello, and thanks for stopping by 🙂

I hope you can take some time and answer a couple of questions for me in the comments section.

I am lucky enough to have a growing network of writers that I would love to know more about. I have visited most of your blogs although I’m still working on getting to them all, and am learning to be better at networking by leaving feedback while I’m there. Beyond what I’ve already discovered, there are just a few questions I’d like to ask that would help me to get to know you better. And I promise I’ll be around to read your posts much more regularly in the future 🙂

Also, I’m in the process of a book project that you may be able to help me with. I’m trying to collect some useful information for writer’s just starting out. I have my own ideas but it would help to get your input. If you could tell me what information would have helped you out most before you got your author platform started – it would be super helpful to me.

I have read some of your books and really enjoyed them. I’d like to read more.  I am also looking to introduce my book club to your work which they may not otherwise happen to come across.  It would be awesome to refer your book to them so please leave me a link to your books after your comments –  pretty please and thank you 🙂

I leave reviews at the points of purchase and encourage my book club members to also.

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First-Draft Success Every Time You Write – The Evolutionary Mind

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Your first-draft is the most important part of any writing project. This is the foundation to what will be your prized work of art…..

Continue Reading: First-Draft Success Every Time You Write – The Evolutionary Mind