Tag Archives: Mundus Media Ink

Wednesdays Visual Writing Prompt

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Wednesdays Visual Writing Prompt

Use this prompt to think outside the box, to go somewhere with your writing that you had never dare go before. See what kind of magic you can work with that brilliant mind of yours. You are a storyteller so this should be a breeze.

Maybe you could use this prompt to add a scene to the current book you are writing. Maybe you could start a short story that you can give away for free to subscribers of your blog. A picture like this can spark ideas you may never have considered.

The Rules

There aren’t really many rules, just enough to get your blog some attention and get new people interested in your writing or the current book you have to offer.

  • Write in any genre you like – poetry too
  • Tag this post in your post (share this post to your WordPress blog as a new post) so I can find you (it will ping back to this post), then I can check out your work, and promote you on my social sites.
  • If you want, when you’re done, Check which famous writer you write like with a statistical analysis tool, which analyzes your word choice and writing style and compares them with those of the famous writers. Just paste your completed work at  I Write Like – You will be given a badge that says which famous author you write like and you can paste the html into the end of your Wednesday Visual Writer’s Prompt, if you like, to show us all your badge! AWESOME!
  • You have until the following Tuesday to complete this writer’s prompt, then I will be posting a new one on the following day, next Wednesday.

If you have any suggestions for future Wednesday Visual Writing Prompts, please let me know in the comments:-)

I look forward to reading your writing.

(if you post past the deadline I will do my best to read your work and share it on my social networks as time permits).

Have Fun!

Choose the Cover for a New Thriller

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Cover Concept Contest

for author Joseph Carpenter

Which concept you would choose for the cover of “Special Report”

When a mysterious faith healer suddenly appears in Texas, Satan and the Federal government join forces to discredit him and stop his followers from gaining too much power. But when Amy Frostberg, an up and coming reporter for the Texas News Television Network is tasked with getting to the bottom of the story, she finds herself in the middle of a battle between good and evil.

This is a book cover concept which will also be a poster for the future movie.

Joseph E. Miller, aka Joseph Carpenter,  directs, writes, and produces films for television, cable and movies. 

Joseph enlisted in the US Army and spent five years in Western Europe during the height of the Cold War as a Counter Intelligence Agent with the 66th and later served as a Recon Scout with the famed Echo Company, 2nd Battalion 506th Infantry (Currahee) 101st Airborne Division in Vietnam from December 1969 to November 1970. He was wounded in action in November 1970.

A graduate of the University of Maryland, Duke holds BS and MA degrees and has received numerous, national and international awards for his work including, the Honor Award of the Association of Military Surgeons International, a Certificate of Merit from the Entertainment Industry Council and the coveted CINE Golden Eagle.

Some of his work includes:

JUST PUBLISHED

Joseph, who has made over fifty non-fiction films, written more than one-hundred and fifty newspaper and magazine articles, numerous film and television scripts, produced several TV movies and is currently producing two feature films, “Jonni Dingo’s Eyeball,” and “Hot Rod Zombies,” also writes under the pseudonym of Duke Zimmer.

The Romanovsky Stain” by Duke Zimmer is the first of five novels in the “After Action Report” series featuring Jacob Steiner. The true art of spy thrillers, as they should be told. Duke Zimmer combines a unique and captivating plot and a memorable setting with flawless writing skill to bring to life a fascinating thriller. Recently awarded Reader’s Favorite.
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download

 

Get Organized with Twitter Lists

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by M.R. Goodhew

Twitter lists are your friend. When people follow you, you start to get a feel for who they are, you may want to add them to a list in order to keep better track of them, or to categorize them under a certain subject that relates to marketing your books and growing your business.

Twitter lists are a great way to keep track of all of the people you want to follow in a specific way. I have lists which include my top re-tweeters, editors, influencers, writing advice, clients, my favorite authors, books I have purchased, and more. Below is a screenshot of where you can find and manage your twitter lists.

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You can make lists to keep track of certain people in your network. You may want to make a list of the people who retweet you often. You simply add them to the list you create for them, and then select the list to view the most recent tweets of everyone you have added to the list.

There are two types of twitter lists, there is a public list and a private list. In a public list, anytime someone is added to the list they are notified in their notifications inbox. The notification will tell them that you added them to a list and will tell them what the list is called and send them a link to it. Also, if someone in your network finds any of your public lists interesting, they can subscribe to it and it will be added to their own lists, but you will still maintain control of the list. With a private list, no one can see the list, subscribe to the list, and no one that has been added to the list can see that they’ve been added. Both kinds of lists are helpful when it comes to building an audience and here is why:

With a public list, not only can you separate followers into compartments by how you know them, or what they specialize in, the list could also be used as a resource that your followers find useful which makes you a good person to keep following. Your followers can subscribe to the list and benefit from the content you have gathered there. You can tweet about your list to attract new followers.

I don’t know about you, but I have a hard time keeping track of the people I meet in real life so keeping track of the thousands of twitter followers I’ve connected with is not an easy task. Private lists are great for keeping track of your followers.  These private lists can help you differentiate between who your followers are, and what they do. The lists will help you network with them in the future.

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What kinds of lists should you create?

Not only can you create lists to keep track of who your followers are and what they do, you can create targeted lists that you can use to build your brand.

One of the ways you can build a targeted list is by searching LinkedIn contact member’s profiles for their twitter handles and then adding them to a list that you’ve created like Publishers, Marketers, Authors, Designers, Editors, or Agents.

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In the picture above you can see where on their LinkedIn profile that you can find their twitter handle.

These lists are a great way to categorize your content on twitter and to keep track of your followers in relation to their content or occupation. When you select one of your lists, you will see a feed of all of the most recent tweets from the people you have added to that list.

Finding Twitter Lists

You can do a search for twitter lists by typing “social media lists” into the search box that’s located on the upper right hand side of the page next to your profile picture.

You can search for these lists, view the feed, and select influential list members to see what lists they have that you may want to subscribe to. When you subscribe to a list it will show up in your lists section.

You can create lists for just about anything so have fun! Just remember to monitor your lists regularly. They were designed to make your twitter experience tailored to you and your brand. The lists make it easy for you to steer clear of the normal feed window where you might find a lot of spam, and to focus on what matters to you.

What kinds of lists can you recommend?

 

 

Cover Concept Contest: Vote for your Favorite Cover

This is a book cover design I have been working on recently which will be a movie poster as well. Most of the book cover designs closely follow my clients vision for the manuscript.

I have to say that I am biased and prefer my original illustration which was an abstract of a man walking out of the desert with the sun behind him. I think that as a book cover it catches the viewer off guard and draws them in with the line-work moving in toward the sun. I think it is a unique book cover illustration that would stand out from the crowd while cleverly representing the story.

Whichever book cover design you choose, please also let me know what you think of the book cover illustration in the comments below

Remember that these are just book cover concepts, so nothing is set in stone and they look rough around the edges. Also the quality is not as fine or detailed as a finished work would be. I appreciate you taking the time to vote because your decision helps me to take a step back and look at the book cover designs from a different perspective.

Thank You

 

 

Craig Boyack – Guest Post: Short Story Writing

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I really appreciate the invitation, and the topic challenge. I never really put much thought into how I came to write short form stuff. It kind of evolved, but reflecting upon that, hopefully, leads me to a good article.

Once upon a time, I wanted to write a novel. I picked up my iPad and started typing away with no idea what I was doing. I had no idea what the rules were, or that they even existed. Looking back, it was one of the most enjoyable experiences of my writing career.

The final product sucked, but I didn’t know that at the time. I kind of wandered from one cool idea to the next without much of a game plan. What I wound up with was quite a bit like a television series. The same characters engaged in tiny vignettes that were kind of cool. Archaeologist might look at those one day and decide they were my first short stories. (They certainly weren’t a novel.)

I’ve always loved short form stuff, and in many ways prefer it to a novel length work. Time is a big factor for me, and I really dig a story I can complete in one session. Prior to that first “practice” novel, I read lots of Poe, O’Henry, and magazines. I enjoy some of the ones dedicated to short stories, like Hitchock’s, Ellery Queen, and others. It never really occurred to me to write my own.

From magazines, I wound my way into comics. I think this is a wonderful way to tell a story, and there are some great graphic novels out there these days.

My Blog, Entertaining Stories, had been live for about a year when October rolled around. I wanted to do something on my blog that felt like Halloween. I enjoy reading a kind of micro-fiction called Creepy Pasta. I thought I might try my hand at that.

I did some snooping around, and someone has a website by that name. I probably have no legal worries, but didn’t want to step on anyone’s toes either. Who knows, that person might someday prove to be an ally in my self publishing journey. I came up with the name Macabre Macaroni instead.

I posted a complete story per week during October, and my blog stats spiked. One of them was the most popular post I ever made for a long time, and it’s still in my top ten. I decided the short form still had fans somewhere out there, and did a bit of digging.

Traditional publishing shunned the short form. Oh sure, some of the biggest name authors can get away with a book of short stories, but for the rest of us it’s pretty limited. Amazon changed all that for us. These days, novellas, novelettes, short stories, and even poetry are making a comeback.

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I’m a big believer in challenging myself, and include a personal challenge in all of my novels. It might be unnoticed by the reader, but it forces me to grow and improve. I approached short stories with that mindset. I’ll never know if I can write one until I write one.

I scoped out my competition, and many of them offered a single short story for 99¢. Others were writing a series, and offering a prequel for 99¢. I decided to offer a book full of short stories, and micro-fiction, for 99¢. It seems like a better deal, and it sells pretty well for me.

I searched for the rules once again, and there aren’t many. Sites offer up word count for the various lengths, but none of them seem to agree. Therefore; I reject their reality and substitute my own. I break it down this way:

  • Flash Fiction = one paragraph
  • Micro Fiction = a decent blog post. 1000 words, pushing my luck at 1500
  • Short story = 5000 to 30,000 words
  • Novella = 30,000 to 80,000 words
  • Novel = 80,000 words and up

It used to bother me that there are holes in my list. It also bothered me that novelette didn’t find a home. Today, I really don’t care. The actual story is more important than the pigeonhole it goes in. As a self publisher, I don’t have to conform to a bunch of categories that different websites define differently anyway.

My short form tales are also proving grounds for me. I called the first book The Experimental Notebook for a reason. Short form allows me to experiment with new things. I recently wrote one that I’m pretty excited about as a big monologue. It would never work as a novel, but I think it’s a great short story. I also wrote my first epistolary style story as a short story.

At some point, I’m going to put out a second Experimental Notebook. The first one sells well, and I’ve gotten some wonderful reviews. It can also be looked at as a gateway drug into my novels. Someone might take a 99¢ chance, and decide one of my novels might be fun.

I write speculative fiction, and for me the fences are pretty far apart. My stuff varies from paranormal to science fiction, and the occasional fantasy. This gives me plenty of room to keep things fresh, and the short form stuff does the same.


I hope I’ve encouraged some of you to take a chance on short form. As writers, you can try new things without dedicating months to a project to see if it works. Now you can use those cool ideas that won’t carry an entire novel. As readers, you can enjoy a complete story on your commuter bus, or coffee break.

If you’d like to check out some of mine, you can read The Experimental Notebook of C. S. Boyack here: http://a-fwd.com/asin-com=B014S2BA4U

Cover Art

A speculative selection of micro-fiction and short stories. These were designed to be short reads for your commute, coffee break, and other times when readers are pressed for time. This book contains a bit of science fiction, some fantasy, and paranormal stories. 

I’m excited to see short fiction returning in popularity. I hope you will enjoy these stories as much as I did.

 

 

Connect with Me

Follow my blog:

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Check out my novels here:

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